How to Shingle a Barn Style Roof

A building can look drastically different with different types of roofs. The barn-style roof in particular is common on farms for good reason. It's stylish, easy to build and maintain, and leaves a usable space on the top floor.


Shingling this style of roof is simple. However, it requires the use of the correct technique and a lot of dedication. Doing it right not only ensures that the building is protected from the elements but also that it looks great. Let’s cover how to shingle a roof in the barn style.

 


Getting Started with Shingling a Barn Style Roof

The ‘barn style’ is also known as a Gambrel style roof that has a sloppy order on each side of the roof. The shingle is made of asphalt.


A warm summer day is a suitable period to complete the job as the tarred sides of the asphalt shingle are easier to work with when warm.


Getting ready

Start by going through the manufacturer’s instructions on how to install the shingles. You might find some valuable information.


Then, go through your design and determine the number of asphalt squares needed in covering the gambrel roof. The bundles of shingles range from three to five bundles, depending on the sizes.  A square is enough to cover about 10ft. by 10ft. area, or 100 square feet of roof.


A little math goes a long way

Measure and add the square footage of every section of the roof and add 5% of this total to compensate for waste. Dividing the total by 100 will determine the number of squares needed.


Shingle away

At the outer corner lowest sloping face of the gambrel roof, lay the first asphalt shingle. Get roofing tacks or at least three nails through the upper, nondecorative portion of the shingle with a nail gun, so that it’s secured flat against the decking. The next shingle is laid next to the first one and secured as the first one. 


Keep going

At this point, you’ve probably fallen into a comfortable routine. Continue going at it from end to end until you reach the end of the roof face.

When you get to the ridge, use three-tab shingles to make the ridge caps for the top of the shed ridge. Cut off shingles to fit the ridge spaces.


A different style

Installation of the ridge cap is unlike that of the sloppy sides which is in the fashion of laying bricks. The ridge caps are in the order of equally placed boxes, only horizontally, from the front of the house to the back.  The last ridge cap will have the roof tacks exposed; cover the roof tar to prevent tacks from getting rusted.


Conclusion

And that’s how to shingle a roof in the barn style. When done right, a barn style roof will provide excellent drainage and have long-lasting results in addition to making your building look great.


As a contractor, you must do it to your client's satisfaction. Other than technique, you also need quality materials to achieve this. On that note, where do you get these materials from?


Come on over to External link opens in new tab or windowPreferred Roofing. We are a roofing supply company with roofing accessories for all residential roofing projects. Preferred Roofing Supply is a family-owned company with years of experience in the construction industry.


Our Georgia-based company is the one-stop shop for all things roofing and siding for the building professional. We’ve got an eye for high-quality products that we’ll supply to you at great prices. You can reach us at External link opens in new tab or windowPreferred Roofing Supply or call us at 678-395-6880.